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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Development, Not Division: Local Versus External Perceptions of the Niger-Nigeria Boundary
Author:Miles, William F.S.
Year:2005
Periodical:Journal of Modern African Studies
Volume:43
Issue:2
Period:June
Pages:297-320
Language:English
Geographic terms:Niger
Nigeria
Subjects:boundaries
border control
Hausa
images
Politics and Government
Inter-African Relations
Development and Technology
History and Exploration
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Link:http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4E929BCAA5C973952296
Abstract:This article traces the evolution of the boundary between Niger and Nigeria over the past 20 years. It focuses in particular on a single border crossing that separates two neighbouring Hausa villages of equivalent demographic size, administrative status, and economic importance. During the past two decades, border control, monitoring and surveillance have gradually intensified, resulting in the establishment of immigration and customs offices on the Nigerian side of the boundary and a 'douane' (customs) post on the Niger side. However, local inhabitants do not view these changes in terms of ethnic partition or division. Rather, they see border control infrastructure positively, in terms both of development and national identity. For the border line Hausa, identity is not zero-sum: feeling more and more Nigérien/Nigerian does not result in diminution of their 'Hausa-ness'. Post-9/11 international pressures to intensify border controls and monitoring in regions where Muslim extremists are thought to shelter highlight contradictions between indigenous and international conceptions of the African frontier. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum. [Journal abstract]
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