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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:'Iku ya j'esin': politically motivated suicide, social honor, and chieftaincy politics in early colonial Ibadan
Author:Adeboye, OlufunkeISNI
Year:2007
Periodical:Canadian Journal of African Studies
Volume:41
Issue:2
Pages:189-225
Language:English
Geographic term:Nigeria
Subjects:suicide
traditional rulers
Yoruba
honour
Ibadan polity
Oyo polity
1800-1899
1900-1909
1910-1919
Link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/40380210
Abstract:Politically motivated suicide was a common occurrence in early colonial Ibadan (Nigeria). This paper argues that the desire to preserve personal and family honour in the face of impending ignominy was a major factor that moved public figures to commit suicide, and colonial rule could not immediately sweep aside the ideals of heroic honour associated with militarism. What forces 'institutionalized' politically motivated suicide in Yorubaland? What circumstances were considered ignominious at different periods of Ibadan history? What did it mean to have honour in death? Did such suicides have any cleansing effect on society? The author first examines relevant theories of honour and of suicide to see what light these could shed on the Yoruba/Ibadan cases discussed in the paper. The next two sections examine the idea and practice of suicide in Old Oyo and in 19th-century Ibadan respectively, in order to accentuate the changes and continuities that presaged the colonial period. This is followed by a presentation of the suicide cases of three principal chiefs - 'Baale' Dada Opadere (1907), 'Baale' Irefin (1915) and 'Balogun' Ola (1917). Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum. in English and French [ASC Leiden abstract]
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