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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Zimbabwe's parliamentary election of 2005: the myth of new electoral laws
Author:Kriger, NormaISNI
Year:2008
Periodical:Journal of Southern African Studies
Volume:34
Issue:2
Pages:359-378
Language:English
Geographic term:Zimbabwe
Subjects:election law
democratization
authoritarianism
Link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/03057070802038025
Abstract:In the run-up to the March 2005 parliamentary election in Zimbabwe, the ruling party introduced two new electoral laws. It effectively marketed these laws as 'new' and 'democratic' to the Southern African Development Community (SADC), whose guidelines for a democratic election were the benchmark for assessing the legitimacy of the election. Rather than evaluating these laws in relation to the SADC guidelines, as most analysts and political organizations did, this article examines the new electoral laws in the context of the electoral rules which the regime had introduced ahead of the 2000 parliamentary and the 2002 presidential elections. Adopting this perspective, the article documents for the first time how the parliamentary laws largely reproduced the undemocratic electoral rules which the executive had hastily introduced ahead of the 2000 and 2002 national elections to entrench its power. The Zimbabwe case illustrates how an authoritarian regime may use the rhetoric of democratic reform to conceal its hegemonic project. Notes, ref., sum. [Journal abstract]
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