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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Tillage and farmyard manure effects on crusting and compacting soils at Katumani, semi-arid Kenya
Authors:Biamah, E.K.
Sterk, G.ISNI
Stroosnijder, L.ISNI
Year:2007
Periodical:Discovery and Innovation (ISSN 1015-079X)
Volume:19
Issue:4
Period:December
Pages:38-47
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms:Kenya
East Africa
Subjects:soil management
land degradation
fertilizers
savannas
Agriculture, Agronomy, Forestry
Farm manure
Tillage
Soil crusting
Soil compaction
External link:https://www.ajol.info/index.php/dai/article/view/15805
Abstract:In semi-arid Kenya, the most dominant soil types are of limited agricultural productivity due to crusting and compaction. The occurrence of soil crusting and compaction is attributed to seasonal rainfall characteristics, physical soil properties and bad tillage practices. Soil crusting and compaction decrease rainwater infiltration and increase surface runoff. Seasonal rainwater losses through increased runoff volumes reduce soil moisture and hence result in agricultural drought. This study examines the hydrological effects of two tillage practices with and without farmyard manure on surface runoff and soil loss of crusting and compacting soils under field conditions at Katumani in semi-arid Kenya. Field investigations on rainfall characteristics, surface runoff, soil loss, soil bulk density and soil shear strength covered two rainy seasons (1992-1993). The field treatments were zero tillage and conventional tillage, and two farmyard manure applications. The results obtained show significant effects of conventional and zero tillage and farmyard manure on infiltration and soil moisture, surface runoff and soil loss. Soil crusting and compaction significantly influence the hydrological response of all treatments. These responses are attributed to seasonal rainfall events of varying amounts, intensities and duration, and treatment differences in soil surface conditions and aggregation. Farmyard manure (FYM) application enhances infiltration and reduces soil crusting, compaction, and surface runoff during the initial stages of the rainy season. But in the mid-stages of the rainy season, the effects of FYM on soil aggregation diminish. Conventional tillage without farmyard manure leads to high surface runoff and soil loss in this structurally unstable soil. Zero tillage performs poorly under these soil conditions because of high soil crusting and compaction, low rainwater infiltration and subsequent increase in surface runoff generation. Bibliogr., sum.in English and French. [Journal abstract]
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