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Periodical issue Periodical issue Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Special issue on AERC-Cornell symposium on 'Risk, knowledge and health in Africa'
Editor:Ajakaiye, OluISNI
Year:2009
Periodical:African Development Review (ISSN 1017-6772)
Volume:21
Issue:1
Pages:208
Language:English
Geographic terms:Subsaharan Africa
Burkina Faso
Ethiopia
Ghana
Kenya
Madagascar
Nigeria
Subjects:risk
information
health
malaria
AIDS
households
conference papers (form)
2007
Link:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/afdr.2009.21.issue-1/issuetoc
Abstract:Seven papers, presented at the AERC-Cornell symposium on 'Risk, knowledge and health in Africa' (Nairobi, 31 May-1 June 2007), which explore and analyse, in various combinations, the nexus of risk, knowledge and health in Africa. They use a broad set of techniques and data sets and cover a wide range of countries: Ghana, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Kenya and Madagascar. Jacqueline Vanderpuye-Orgle and Christopher B. Barrett show that in rural Ghana social invisibility is a major barrier to risk pooling. Jann Lay, Ulf Narloch and Toman Omar Mahmoud move from risk mitigation to adaptation to risk by analysing patterns of income diversification of rural households in Burkina Faso between 1994 and 2003. The remaining papers focus on health. Abbi M. Kedir establishes the link between health and productivity using household level panel data for Ethiopia for 1994-2000. Olufunke A. Alaba and Olumuyiwa B. Alaba analyse the incidence of malaria, a major cause of poor health in Africa, in rural Nigeria. The last three papers all deal with HIV/AIDS as a major type of risk in Africa. Markus Frölich and Rosalia Vazquez-Alvarez, and Peter Glick, Josée Randriamamonjy and David E. Sahn focus on knowledge and behaviour in this risky setting in Kenya and Madagascar respectively. In Kenya, while information campaigns have been successful in imparting knowledge, whether such knowledge has changed behaviour is a more complex issue. In Madagascar, more education is a key determinant, as is greater wealth, of better HIV/AIDS knowledge and condom use among women in both rural and urban areas. The final paper, by Giovanna d'Adda, Markus Goldstein, Joshua Graff Zivin, Mabel Nangami and Harsha Thirumurthy, uses evidence from Kenya to document the benefits of antiretroviral (ARV) treatment for household activity, specifically housework, firewood and water collection, and care giving. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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