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Periodical issue Periodical issue Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Interpreting land markets in Africa
Editors:Colin, Jean-PhilippeISNI
Woodhouse, PhilipISNI
Year:2010
Periodical:Africa: Journal of the International African Institute (ISSN 0001-9720)
Volume:80
Issue:1
Pages:146
Language:English
Geographic terms:Africa
Ivory Coast - Côte d'Ivoire
Ghana
Zambia
Zimbabwe
Subjects:land tenure
land reform
land rights
market
land
Links:http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayIssue?jid=AFR&volumeId=80&seriesId=0&issueId=01
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/africa_the_journal_of_the_international_african_institute/toc/afr.80.1.html
Abstract:Over the past two decades, a wave of proposals for land tenure reform in many African countries has raised questions about land markets as a means of allocating land that have profound political and economic implications. This collection of articles explores the nature of land markets in Africa. An introductory chapter by Jean-Philippe Colin and Philip Woodhouse discusses the emergence and dynamics of land markets in Africa. Admos Chimhowu and Philip Woodhouse deal with a 'vernacular' land market in Svosve communal lands, Zimbabwe, following the 'Fast Track' land reforms of 2000-2003. Nicholas J. Sitko explores the ways in which efforts to expand private land tenure, coupled with the continued centrality of customary land administration in Zambia, produce a fractured system of land governance in which localized markets for land emerge but are forced to operate in a clandestine manner. Using the case of Nandom in the Upper West Region of Ghana, Carola Lentz traces the history of debates on land transfers in northern Ghana and discusses ways in which African and European views on land tenure influenced and instrumentalized each other. Jean-Pierre Chauveau and Jean-Philippe Colin offer an empirical perspective regarding customary land sales in Côte d'Ivoire, focusing on their sociopolitical embeddedness as well as on the implications of such processes for the content of the rights and duties transferred. Kojo Sebastian Amanor is concerned with the contestation of rights to land and labour and the construction of customary land tenure in the forest of Ghana from the 19th century to the present. Finally, Georges Kouamé emphasizes the relation between the intra-family dimension of land rights and the functioning of the land lease market on the basis of the case of the Abure of Côte d'Ivoire. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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