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Periodical issue Periodical issue Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The pre-industrial Cape in the twenty-first century
Editors:Groenewald, GeraldISNI
Mitchell, LauraISNI
Year:2010
Periodical:South African Historical Journal (ISSN 0258-2473)
Volume:62
Issue:3
Pages:435-605
Language:English
Geographic terms:The Cape
South Africa
Subjects:colonial history
historiography
slaves
Afrikaners
press
missions
schooling
Link:https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rshj20/62/3
Abstract:This special issue of the 'South African Historical Journal' reflects on the state of the field of pre-industrial history at the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa. It emerged from sessions held at the Southern African Historical Society conference 'Breaking boundaries, blurring borders' held in June 2009. Scholarship on colonial Cape history has tended to divide the 18th from the 19th century, a trend reinforced by language and archival differences between the period of Dutch East India Company (VOC) and British rule. This special issue suggests new periodizations. Other trends include the influence of transregional histories, an increasingly layered interplay between individual and group identities, and increasing attention to the present motivations for scholarly work. An introductory article by Laura J. Mitchell and Gerald Groenewald is followed by articles on gender and violence in Cape slave narratives and post-narratives (Jessica Murray), historical and literary re-iterations of Dutch settler republicanism (David Johnson), the circulation of the 'African Journal' as an example of the British colonial press (Christopher Holdridge), the figure of Revd. James Read in missionary narratives (Jared McDonald), and State schooling and scandal in a mid-19th century Cape village (Caledon) (Helen Ludlow). In a historiographical essay, Nigel Worden reflects on the origins and development of the recent work on the Cape. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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