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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Capitalist globalisation and the role of the international community in resource conflicts in Africa
Author:Amuwo, AdekunleISNI
Year:2009
Periodical:Africa Development: A Quarterly Journal of CODESRIA (ISSN 0850-3907)
Volume:34
Issue:3-4
Pages:227-266
Language:English
Geographic term:Africa
Subjects:globalization
natural resources
geopolitics
political economy
conflict
Abstract:The principal thesis of this paper is that under contemporary capitalist globalization, the so-called international community constitutes more of the problem than the solution in Africa's resource conflicts. The author argues that the geostrategic and geopolitical interests of major Western and other international powers and the transnational capitalist class, which tend to defend and enhance these interests, have over the past several decades either been the root cause of resource conflicts in Africa or have fuelled, exacerbated and prolonged them. The almost devotional attitude of the continent's ruling elites to the values and institutions of capitalist globalization - and its resultant unequal distribution of the gains and pains of market reforms - have equally contributed to resource conflicts. While there is a complex interplay between internal and external factors and actors, on balance external causation has, by far, dwarfed internal explanations of these conflicts. African societies and peoples have thus suffered an unmitigated internationalization, exploitation and pillage of their rich tropical hardwood, gems, mineral and oil resources. The paper proposes a strategic coalition of victims of capitalist globalization and capitalist militarization in Africa and elsewhere (nations, societies, communities and peoples) to systematically confront and oppose the most invidious process that has turned Africa's resource blessing into a resource burden. Bibliogr., sum. in English and French. [Journal abstract]
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