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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Chiefs, traitors, and representatives: the construction of a political repertoire in independence-era Cameroun
Author:Terretta, MeredithISNI
Year:2010
Periodical:International Journal of African Historical Studies (ISSN 0361-7882)
Volume:43
Issue:2
Pages:227-253
Language:English
Geographic term:Cameroon
Subjects:independence
nationalism
chieftaincy
political history
Bamileke
cartoons
Link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/25741429
Abstract:In 1956, the French administration in the UN trusteeship territory of Cameroon began to depose traditional chiefs in the Bamileke region for their involvement in anticolonial, pronationalist politics. Also, 1956 was the year after the French administration proscribed the popular 'Union des populations du Cameroun' (UPC), the nationalist party, which claimed the unification of the French and British territories of Cameroon, and total independence from foreign rule. This paper explores the meanings of nationalism in Cameroon just after the UPC's official proscription, and Bamileke communities' efforts to come to terms with the politics of decolonization. It explains why, in 1956, among Bamileke communities, the politics of decolonization became linked to restoring autonomy ('lepue') to chieftaincies. The paper historicizes the construction of the new political repertoire in newspaper articles; written petitions from Bamileke villages to the UN; oral songs; and the first series of political cartoons in Cameroon printed in a leftist newspaper. Notes, ref. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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