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Periodical issue Periodical issue Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Special issue: Death and loss in Africa
Editors:Lee, RebekahISNI
Vaughan, MeganISNI
Year:2012
Periodical:African Studies (ISSN 1469-2872)
Volume:71
Issue:2
Pages:163-322
Language:English
Geographic terms:East Africa
Benin
South Africa
Zambia
Subjects:death
mourning
funerals
traffic accidents
suicide
gender
migrants
children
Abstract:The papers in this special issue on the African experience with the management of death and loss were earlier presented at a conference held in South Africa in April 2010. Lorena Nunez and Brittany Wheeler explore the spiritual and material consequences of 'death out of place' for cross-border migrants in Johannesburg. Through narratives of 'twice deaths' - fatal road accidents en route to funerals - in South Africa, Rebekah Lee probes how African mourners and funeral undertakers respond to the risks presented by death 'on the road'. Mark Lamont's article offers a political and ethical critique of the 'epidemiological turn' in global road safety through an analysis of the ways in which East Africans draw upon conceptual and spiritual factors in bearing witness to fatal road accidents. Patience Mususa looks at how residents in an impoverished Copperbelt town in Zambia utilize popular music as part of an expanded repertoire of performative practices. Megan Vaughan reflects on the variety of meanings Africans attribute to suicide in East and southern Africa. Mieke deGelder's article shows how women workers in an inner-city Christian NGO in Pretoria draw on 'vernacularized' conceptions of women's rights and 'fidelity' to articulate a highly gendered 'sense-making' of death. Lauraine Vivian examines the moral and emotional contours of loss as medical staff cope with child death at a paediatric intensive-care unit in South Africa. Finally, grief's fundamentally social character is the main concern of JoŽl Noret's meditation on the grieving process in southern Benin. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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