Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home AfricaBib Go to database home

bibliographic database

Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Worms, frogs, crabs, and the eye of God: Mpondo and Hlubi perceptions of white malevolence and surveillance
Author:Blackbeard, Susan I.ISNI
Year:2011
Periodical:South African Historical Journal (ISSN 0258-2473)
Volume:63
Issue:4
Pages:514-536
Language:English
Geographic terms:South Africa
The Cape
Subjects:magic
images
Whites
missions
Hlubi
Pondo
race relations
colonial period
Link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02582473.2011.624543
Abstract:This paper extends the debate on Black-perceived White supernatural powers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth-century Eastern Cape, South Africa - a conversation initiated by Sean Redding (1996), and developed further by Clifton Crais (2002), whose main contention has been rebutted by Jeff Peires (2004). Having briefly considered their claims, this paper examines, first, Western Mpondo perceptions of missionaries' extraordinary or supernatural powers by focusing on a dream/vision of herdboys, and second, a claim that the amaHlubi in the Matatiele district ceased resistance to dipping owing to fear of White supernatural powers. Finally, the paper shows how, in different ways from those described by Redding and Crais, these powers were perceived by various groups, and counteracted or exploited. Notes, ref., sum. [Journal abstract]
Views

Cover