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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Memorial politics: challenging the dominant party's narrative in Namibia
Author:Zuern, ElkeISNI
Year:2012
Periodical:Journal of Modern African Studies (ISSN 0022-278X)
Volume:50
Issue:3
Pages:493-518
Language:English
Geographic terms:Namibia
Germany
Subjects:genocide
anticolonialism
heroes
monuments
memory
External link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/41653719
Abstract:Greater international attention to human rights since the end of the Cold War, particularly to genocide, has offered activists opportunities to draw on transnational networks and norms. Many examples have been documented of the varying successes of domestic movement organizations employing international support. Much less attention has been paid to cases lacking significant organizations, but small groups and even individuals can draw attention to their demands if they effectively engage transnational interest. Genocide offers a particularly potent means of generating attention. Namibia is engaged in domestic debates over crimes committed by German forces over a century ago. In a country with no large opposition party and no significant social movement mobilization, a number of relatively small groups of activists are indirectly challenging the power of the dominant party by correcting its one-sided narrative of the country's anti-colonial heroes. German efforts to respond to crimes committed in the past offer further opportunities for activists to draw attention to heroes and histories beyond those celebrated by the dominant party. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum. [Journal abstract]
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