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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:A tradition of dissent: West Indians and Liberian journalism, 1830-1970
Author:Burrowes, Carl PatrickISNI
Year:2012
Periodical:Ecquid Novi: African Journalism Studies (ISSN 0256-0054)
Volume:33
Issue:2
Pages:71-86
Language:English
Geographic term:Liberia
Subjects:press
journalists
Afro-Caribbeans
media history
Link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02560054.2012.684395
Abstract:As Liberia moved toward greater freedom of expression in 1971 after several decades of authoritarian rule, 'The New York Times' credited a longtime critic of officialdom, Albert Porte, and a three-month-old magazine, the 'Revelation', with being pacesetters of the emerging trend (T.A. Johnson, 20 October 1973). Porte shared with several editors of the 'Revelation' one commonality not noted in 'The New York Times' article, and that was their West Indian origin. This article retraces the participation in Liberian journalism by persons of Caribbean descent, arguing that their specific contribution was a tradition of social criticism. The time frame extends from 1830, the year the nation's first newspaper was founded, to 1971, when President William V.S. Tubman died, after serving as Head of State for 27 years while dismantling protections for civil liberties (T. Wreh, 1976). By examining behaviours and artifacts over such a long span, it is hoped that this study will better distinguish idiosyncratic patterns from those that are culturally determined. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum. [Journal abstract]