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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Good governance and democratic leadership for an African Renaissance: a reflection on AU member States' compliance with the AUCPCC
Author:Mangu, André Mbata B.ISNI
Year:2012
Periodical:International Journal of African Renaissance Studies (ISSN 1818-6874)
Volume:7
Issue:2
Pages:18-37
Language:English
Geographic term:Africa
Subjects:corruption
governance
African agreements
African Union
Link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/18186874.2013.774696
Abstract:After decades of corrupt postcolonial governance, African leaders collectively acknowledged that good governance was a prerequisite for African renewal and required an unprecedented fight against corruption prevailing on the continent. The Constitutive Act of the African Union (CA-AU) features good governance among its objectives and principles. Good governance was stressed further in subsequent AU instruments adopted within the framework of the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) and its African Peer-Review Mechanism (APRM). AU leaders' commitment to fighting corruption culminated in the adoption of the African Union Convention on Preventing and Combating Corruption (AUCPCC). As Africans prepare to commemorate the first decade since the adoption of the AUCPCC, this article reflects on AU member States' compliance with this instrument, the challenges, and the prospects for a successful fight against corruption. It argues that despite some progress made, this scourge remains unabated and has even aggravated. Most African States have failed to comply fully with the AUCPCC. However, the fight against corruption should be strengthened with the participation of all the stakeholders at national, regional and international levels. Partnerships have to be built and consolidated without neglecting the crucial contribution of the people under a democratic leadership committed to good governance in order to achieve an African Renaissance in the 21st century. Bibliogr., note, ref., sum. [Journal abstract]
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