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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Africa and its diaspora: the principal reciprocal benefits to be derived from the amended Constitutive Act of the African Union
Author:Yorke, Gosnell L.ISNI
Year:2012
Periodical:International Journal of African Renaissance Studies (ISSN 1818-6874)
Volume:7
Issue:2
Pages:79-95
Language:English
Geographic term:Africa
Subjects:diasporas
African agreements
African Union
pan-Africanism
Africanization
Link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/18186874.2013.774699
Abstract:Under article 3(q) of the Protocol on Amendments to the Constitutive Act of the African Union, the following objective is stated: 'invite and encourage the full participation of the African diaspora as an important part of our continent, in building the African Union (AU)'. According to the AU, the African diaspora 'are peoples of African descent and heritage outside the continent, irrespective of their citizenship and who remain committed to contribute to the development of the continent and the building of the African Union'. In this revised and edited version of a public lecture, delivered on 25 October 2012 at the University of South Africa, Pretoria, it is argued that the 2003 amendment to the Constitutive Act of the AU, in which the African diaspora is now considered the sixth region of the AU, provides the framework within which some fundamental and reciprocal benefits can be derived from an ongoing interaction between Africa and its diaspora - especially its older or historic diaspora. However, the amendment has not yet been ratified by the requisite number of African States and might still be in need of some degree of disambiguation. In essence, the author contends that the principal reciprocal benefits that can accrue from this interaction between Africa and its diaspora might best be captured in the language of pan-Africanization and re-Africanization respectively. Bibliogr., note, sum. [Journal abstract, edited]
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