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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Knowledge and consumption of indigenous food by primary school children in Vhembe District in Limpopo Province
Authors:Mbhatsani, Hlekani Venessa
Mbhenyane, Xikombiso G.
Makuse, Sefora H.M.
Year:2011
Periodical:Indilinga: African Journal of Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Volume:10
Issue:2
Pages:210-227
Language:English
Geographic term:South Africa
Subjects:nutrition education
primary education
food consumption
vegetables
fruits
Link:http://hdl.handle.net/10520/EJC61396
Abstract:The article is based on a study that aimed at determining knowledge, availability and consumption of indigenous foods by primary school children. Two primary schools from two villages of the Vhembe District in Limpopo Province, South Africa were selected for the study. From these schools, one hundred and fifty-four children aged 9-14 years in Grades 5 and 6 participated. A validated questionnaire was used for data collection. It consisted of sections on socio-demographic information, knowledge on availability, and consumption of indigenous foods. The aim of the study was to increase the consumption of indigenous foods by primary school children through nutrition education. The article presents information on types, availability and consumption of indigenous foods before manipulation and six months after the intervention. The results indicate that many children had prior knowledge about indigenous foods, particularly fruits and vegetables. Data also suggested that their knowledge increased six months after the intervention. The children consumed indigenous foods, notably fruits and vegetables and there was an improvement six months after the intervention. The study revealed that knowledge of indigenous foods depends on availability and accessibility in the community where children live as well as on the household level. However, in order to improve awareness, there is need to include knowledge of indigenous foods as part of the school curriculum. Bibliogr., sum. [Journal abstract, edited]
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