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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Living in the Marikana world: the state, capital and society
Author:Ndlovu, Morgan
Year:2013
Periodical:International Journal of African Renaissance Studies (ISSN 1818-6874)
Volume:8
Issue:1
Pages:46-58
Language:English
Geographic term:South Africa
Subjects:strikes
miners
political repression
violence
postcolonialism
Link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/18186874.2013.834554
Abstract:In this article the author argues that the 'Marikana massacre' of 16 August 2012 at Lonmin mine near Rustenburg in the North-West province of South Africa, in which the South African police shot dead 34 mineworkers for protesting against low wages and other unbearable employment and/or living conditions, cannot be understood as merely an accidental event. This article is a decolonial critique on the Marikana massacre and seeks to explain how the modern world system, since its advent in 1492 as global power structure, has been producing a series of 'Marikana-like' conditions and events on the part of the non-Western subject that underlies its hierarchical arrangement. The article's point of departure is that rather than understand the Marikana massacre as a unique event or accident, it can better be characterized as a sign of the non-Western subject's subjection to Western-centred modernity. The article explicates how the modern South African State and capital are part of the same 'colonial power matrix' (A. Quijano 2000), hence the two were bound to be on the same side against labour during the Marikana massacre. Bibliogr., sum. [Journal abstract, edited]
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