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Book Book Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Civic agency in Africa: arts of resistance in the 21st century
Editors:Obadare, EbenezerISNI
Willems, WendyISNI
Year:2014
Pages:236
Language:English
City:Woodbridge
Publisher:James Currey
ISBN:1847010865; 9781847010865
Geographic terms:Africa
Angola
Cameroon
Kenya
Mali
Nigeria
Rwanda
South Africa
Subjects:State-society relationship
resistance
informal sector
fraud
popular culture
mass media
Abstract:This book argues that Western notions of State and civil society provide only limited understanding of how power and resistance operate in the African context, where informality is central to the way both State officials and citizens exercise agency. With the principle of informality as a template, the volume examines various modes - organized and unorganized, urban and rural, embodied and discursive, successful and failing - through which Africans contend with power. The book privileges politics and political praxes. Part I considers emerging forms of African resistance in the context of a frail neoliberal nation-State (chapters on resistance against the postcolonial State in general and the Arab Spring in North Africa in particular, by Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni; and the politics of citizen action and resistance in South Africa and Angola, by Bettina von Lieres). Part II examines forms of resistance emerging in the aftermath of the disruptions to livelihoods that have been the result of structural adjustment and conflict (chapters on informality, relocations and urban re-making in Nairobi, Kenya, by Ilda Lindell and Markus Ihalainen; young Cameroonian and Nigerian hustlers and their conversion of global capitalism into a global economy of swindle and fraud, by Basile Ndjio; and everyday resistance as political consciousness in post-genocide Rwanda, by Susan Thomson). The emphasis of Part III is on popular culture as discursive form of resistance (chapters on participatory politics in South Africa, by Innocentia J. Mhlambi; blackness, whiteness and the ambivalences of South African stand-up comedy, by Grace A. Musila; and civic activism in Fela Kuti's music, by Jendele Hungbo). The chapters in the last part deal with publics as everyday sites of resistance (Dorothea Schulz on music, local radio stations and the sounds of cultural belonging in Mali; Daniel Hammett on Zapiro, Zuma and freedom of expression in South Africa). [ASC Leiden abstract]
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