Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home AfricaBib Go to database home

bibliographic database

Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Ethiopian State support to insurgency in Southern Sudan from 1962 to 1983: local, regional and global connections
Author:Aalen, LoviseISNI
Year:2014
Periodical:Journal of Eastern African Studies (ISSN 1753-1063)
Volume:8
Issue:4
Pages:626-641
Language:English
Geographic terms:Ethiopia
Sudan
Subjects:military intervention
cold war
1960-1969
1970-1979
Link:https://doi.org/10.1080/17531055.2014.949403
Abstract:During the 1960s and 1970s, the Government of Ethiopia supplied Southern Sudanese insurgents with arms, training and political support. This support has been explained as retribution for Sudanese aid to Eritrean rebels fighting against the regimes of Emperor Haile Salassie and the Derg. This is one aspect of the Ethiopian rationale for this proxy war (or indirect engagement in a conflict by third parties wishing to influence its strategic outcome), but other factors were also relevant. Based on primary sources from the Ethiopian Ministry of Defence and the National Archives of Great Britain, this article shows that Ethiopian policy was also influenced by local concern for State control in Ethiopia's Western region of Gambella, by the regional interests of Middle Eastern powers in the Horn of Africa and by the global context of Cold War, reflecting a network of multi-level proxy wars. The Ethiopian and Sudanese involvement with secessionist movements in Eritrea and Southern Sudan shows that the two regimes put strategic interest over ideologically driven motivations. The web of proxy wars at the Horn also demonstrates that the conflicts involved are not wholly created, orchestrated and controlled by the State sponsoring the proxy. In both Gambella and inside Southern Sudan, the conflicts predate the external support and have emerged and developed partly independently of the conflicts on the regional and global stages. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum. [Journal abstract, edited]
Views

Cover