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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Special theme section: the Human Economy Project: first steps
Editors:Sharp, JohnISNI
Powers, Theodore
Laterza, Vito
Year:2013
Periodical:Anthropology Southern Africa (ISSN 2332-3264)
Volume:36
Issue:3-4
Language:English
Geographic terms:Mozambique
South Africa
Subjects:livelihoods
economic anthropology
informal sector
Abstract:The Human Economy Project (HEP) posits that the ethnographic research method ought to be at the forefront of efforts to reclaim the economy from the economic experts, by taking careful note of how ordinary people make economy on the street. The special theme section on HEP contains four case studies of the ways in which people adapt to the hostile circumstances created by the big institutions of market, state and business corporation: Responding to the crisis: food co-operatives and the solidarity economy in Greece (Theodoros Rakopoulos); On law and legality in post-apartheid South Africa: insights from a migrant street trader (Jürgen Schraten); Institutions and social change: a case study of the South African National AIDS Council (Theodore Powers); A broken link: two generations in a rural household in Massinga district, southern Mozambique (Albert Farré). The final two articles reflect on the project in more general terms: Towards a human economy: reflections on a new project (John Sharp); Some notes towards a human economy approach (Vito Laterza). Sharp provides information about the project's antecedents, the scholars involved, and the social theory the participants have come to regard as the most appropriate for their aims. Laterza reflects on the potential contribution of the HEP towards a future economy, where markets are retained as vital vessels of economic life and are not synonymous with capitalist exploitation. Bibliogr., notes, sum. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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