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Book Book Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Mean streets: migration, xenophobia and informality in South Africa
Editors:Crush, JonathanISNI
Chikanda, AbelISNI
Skinner, CarolineISNI
Year:2015
Pages:287
Language:English
City:Rondebosch
Publisher:Southern African Migration Programme (SAMP)
ISBN:1920596119; 9781920596118
Geographic term:South Africa
Subjects:migrants
xenophobia
informal sector
entrepreneurs
refugees
urban economy
retail trade
Abstract:This edited volume argues that some of the most resourceful entrepreneurs in the informal economies of several major cities in South Africa are migrants and refugees. The contributors examine socio-economic issues of employment, rent-paying and xenophobia through case studies such as agglomeration economies in Johannesburg, networks of Chinese entrepreneurs, Somali shop owners and cross-border Zimbabwean informal traders. Contributions: Migrant entrepreneurship and informality in South African cities (J. Crush, A. Chikanda, C. Skinner); Doing business with xenophobia (J. Crush, S. Ramachandran); Making an area hot: interrupting trade in an ethnic enclave in Johannesburg's inner city (T. Zack); A transnational space of business: the informal economy of Ivory Park, Johannesburg (A. Charman, L. Petersen); Resilience and innovation: migrant spaza shop entrepreneurs in Soweto, Johannesburg (T. Gumbo); The role of economic factors and 'Guanxi' networks in the success of Chinese shops in Johannesburg (L. Willemse); On the move: Cameroonian migrants in Durban (A. Tafuh, P. Maharaj); Refugees and asylum seekers in Cape Town's informal economy (M. Northcote, B. Dodson); The role of migrant traders in local economies: a case study of Somali spaza shops in Cape Town (V. Gastrow, R. Amit); The role of networks and herd behaviour in the entrepreneurial activity and success of African migrants in South Africa (R. Tengeh); The 'Malayisha' industry and the transnational movement of remittances to Zimbabwe (V. Thebe); Transnational entrepreneurship and informal cross-border trade with South Africa (S. Peberdy, et al.); Unpacking national policy towards the urban informal economy (C. M. Rogerson). [ASC Leiden abstract]
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