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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Remembering my whiteness/imagining my African-ness
Author:D'amant, Antoinette
Year:2015
Periodical:African Identities (ISSN 1472-5851)
Volume:13
Issue:3
Pages:173-183
Language:English
Geographic term:South Africa
Subjects:Whites
identity
self-concept
Link:https://doi.org/10.1080/14725843.2015.1023257
Abstract:This article comprises of reflections on an artwork created during a research exercise using visual methodologies to explore various aspects of identity within the context of autobiographical studies. It interrogates aspects of meaning and identity as a white person in post-apartheid South Africa and post-colonial Africa and traces the author's journey of critical reflection through an interactive process where the visual text, research on predominant theorists in areas related to the white hegemonic gaze, and collaborative comment of colleagues revealed embedded commentary and cultural critique. The author's critical reflections about notions of representation, appropriation, colonialism, essentializing discourses, postmodernism and hybridity are included in this article. Throughout these reflections emerged the constant need to be mindful of not reinforcing whiteness as normative and to be aware of forms of moral distancing and moral superiority. Such critical self-reflection is vital to the author's roles as teacher educator and researcher within the discipline of social justice in education. Although often uncomfortable, the author confronts and remembers her privileged racial identity, fashioned in a divided and exclusive past. She considers what it is she has become and what it is she no longer want to be, and has the audacity of spirit to imagine and reposition herself beyond her white socialization. She recognizes and struggles for the possibility of new frames of understanding and new identities, new social spaces and new communities, beyond the historical differences which keep up separated and alienated. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum. [Journal abstract]
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