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Book Book Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Asian tigers, African lions: comparing the development performance of Southeast Asia and Africa
Editors:Berendsen, BernardISNI
Dietz, TonISNI
Schulte Nordholt, HenkISNI
Veen, Roel van derISNI
Year:2013
ISSN:1568-1777
Issue:12
Pages:524
Language:English
Series:African Dynamics
City:Leiden
Publisher:Brill
ISBN:9789004260009; 9789004256538
Geographic terms:Subsaharan Africa
Asia
Kenya
Nigeria
Tanzania
Uganda
Subjects:economic development
economic policy
Link:http://hdl.handle.net/1887/39100
Abstract:This collective volume is the outcome of the 'Tracking development' research project, which was coordinated by the African Studies Centre and the KITLV (Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies), both in Leiden. The project compared the performance of growth and development in four pairs of countries in Southeast Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa during the last sixty years. It tried to answer the question as to how two regions with comparable levels of income per capita in the 1950s could diverge so rapidly. Why are there so many Asian tigers and not yet so many African lions? What could Africa learn from Southeast Asian development trajectories? Following introductory chapters by Bernard Berendsen & Roel van der Veen, David Henley & Jan Kees van Donge, Peter Lewis, and Ton Dietz, the chapters are grouped into four parts comparing, respectively, Indonesia and Nigeria (Riwanto Tirtosudarmo, Ahmad Helmy Fuady, Akinyinka Akinyoade, and David U. Enweremadu), Malaysia and Kenya (Joseph M. Fernando, Othieno Nyanjom, Bethuel K. Kinuthia & Ton Dietz, and Bethuel K. Kinuthia & Syed Mansoob Murshed), Vietnam and Tanzania (Jan Kees van Donge, Blandina Kilama, and Jamal Msami), and Cambodia and Uganda (André Leliveld & Han ten Brummelhuis, Kheang Un, and Leang Un). In the final chapter, David Booth reflects on the results and draws conclusions for Africa's economic transformation. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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