Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home AfricaBib Go to database home

bibliographic database

Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Book Book Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Agricultural development and food security in Africa: the impact of Chinese, Indian and Brazilian investments
Editors:Cheru, FantuISNI
Modi, RenuISNI
Year:2013
Pages:263
Language:English
Series:Africa now
City:London
Publisher:Zed Books, in association with the Nordic Africa Institute
ISBN:9781780323718; 9781780323725
Geographic terms:Africa
Brazil
China
India
Subjects:agricultural development
food security
foreign investments
Link:http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:nai:diva-1759
Abstract:Private enterprises and State-owned companies from India, China and Brazil have started to invest in the agricultural sector of many African countries, ranging from agricultural inputs and irrigation services to farming, food processing and distribution. The three countries have become an important source of finance, technology and infrastructure. The aim of this book is to go beyond the current debate on 'land grabbing' and to examine the status and potential contribution of sovereign and private investors from the three countries to the transformation of African agriculture. The book is divided into five sections. In the first, the approach to the research is elaborated, and the contemporary and historical debates on the role of foreign capital in Africa's agricultural development are explained (chapters by Fantu Cheru, Renu Modi and Sanusha Naidu, and Sam Moyo). The second section examines the scope and content of India's private and public sector engagement in African agriculture (chapters by Gurjit Singh, Renu Modi, Dessalegn Rahmato and Rick Bowden). Brazil's strategy to transform African agriculture is the focus of section three (chapters by Thomas Cooper Patriota and Francesco Maria Pierri, Kai Thaler, and Alexandra Arkhangelskaya and Albert Khamatshin). The fourth section focuses exclusively on China's engagement with African agriculture within the framework of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) (chapters by Simon Freemantle and Jeremy Stevens, and Xiuli Xu and Xiaoyun Li). The final chapter presents the editors' conclusions about the impact of Chinese, Indian and Brazilian investments in African agriculture, based on the evidence presented by the contributors. [ASC Leiden abstract].
Views

Cover