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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The influence of Negritude movement on modern African literature and writers: a study of Chinua Achebe's 'Things fall apart' and Elechi Amadi's 'The concubine'
Authors:Onwumere, Alexander A.
Ebulonu, Florence
Year:2014
Periodical:Okike: an African Journal of New Writing (ISSN 0331-0566)
Issue:51
Pages:149-169
Language:English
Geographic terms:Nigeria
Africa
Subjects:novels
Negritude
literary criticism
About persons:Albert Chinualumogu Achebe (1930-2013)ISNI
Elechi Amadi (1934-2016)ISNI
Abstract:Negritude is a movement and an ideology. As a movement, it is deeply rooted in Pan-African congresses, exhibitions, organizations and publications produced to challenge the theory of race hierarchy and black inferiority developed by philosophers such as Friedrich Hegel and Joseph de Gobineau. As an ideology, it is a defining milestone in the rehabilitation of Africa and African diasporic identity and dignity, and thus provided a unifying, fighting and liberating instrument for black Francophone students in the first half of the 20th century in search of their identity. It was an expression of a new humanism that positions black people within a global community of equals. Like any other movement or ideology, Negritude faced grave challenges and criticisms but has continued to survive because of its significant role and influence in the development of African literature. This research examines the influence of Negritude on modern African literature and writers with particular reference to Achebe's 'Things fall apart' and Amadi's 'The concubine'. It contends that Negritude, in spite of criticisms, has not only survived but has also greatly influenced modern African literature and writers. Bibliogr, sum [Journal abstract]
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